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The Gutenberg health study: associations between occupational and private stress factors and work-privacy conflict

Background: Work-privacy conflict (WPC) is no longer a rarity but constitutes a societal problem. The objectives of the present study were (1) to investigate the distribution and prevalence of WPC among the employed participants in the Gutenberg Health Study at baseline and (2) to study the dependence of WPC on a broad range of private life and occupational characteristics as well as on psychosocial working conditions.

Methods: This analysis is based on a representative, population-based sample of 3,709 employees participating in the Gutenberg Health Study. Descriptive and bivariable analyses were carried out separately for women and men. Distribution and prevalence of WPC were examined according to socio-demographic and occupational characteristics as well as psychosocial working conditions. Further, stepwise selection of Poisson log-linear regression models were performed to determine which socio-demographic and occupational characteristics were most associated with the outcome variable WPC and to obtain adjusted prevalence ratios from the final model. The multivariable analyses were conducted both separately for women and men and with all subjects together in one analysis.

Results: There was a high prevalence of WPC in the present study (27.4 % of the men and 23.0 % of the women reported a high or very high WPC). A variety of factors was associated with WPC, e.g. full-time employment, depression and many of the psychosocial risk factors at work. Also, the multivariable results showed that women were of higher risk for a WPC.

Conclusions: By affecting the individual work life, home life, and the general well-being and health, WPC may lead to detrimental effects in employees, their families, employers, and society as a whole. Therefore, the high prevalence of WPC in our sample should be of concern. Among women, the risk for suffering from WPC was even higher, most likely due to multiple burdens.

This article is published in the Journal "BMC Public Health" 2016 16:192.

Bibliographic information

S. Garthus-Niegel, J. Hegewald, A. Seidler, M. Nübling, C. Espinola-Klein, F. Liebers, P. S. Wild, U. Latza, S. Letzel:
The Gutenberg health study: associations between occupational and private stress factors and work-privacy conflict. 
in: BMC Public Health 2016 16:192 2016. Project number: F 2235, PDF file, DOI: 10.1186/s12889-016-2881-8

download file "The Gutenberg health study: associations between occupational and private stress factors and work-privacy conflict" (PDF, 512 KB, Not barrier-free file)

Research Project

Project numberF 2235 StatusCompleted Project Work-related risk factors for cardiovascular diseases

Find out more : Work-related risk factors for cardiovascular diseases …

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